Orlando Shirt Printing

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cavetocanvas:

Jan Steen, The Dissolute Household, c. 1663-64
From the Metropolitan Museum:

Steen’s canvas may be said to concisely catalogue many of Holland’s favorite faults. The sins of Sloth (embodied by the old woman at left), Lust, and Gluttony (the latter concerns any comestible, including tobacco), are at home with seemingly lesser offenses, such as sacrilege (the trampled Bible), gambling (the backgammon board), personal vanity and, of course, poor parenting skills—one of Steen’s standard subjects. These diverse violations lead to the supreme sin in Holland of a disorderly household, a form of discord (indicated here by the snapped lute strings) that in Dutch genre paintings is confirmed by litter on the floor and cats having carte blanche in the larder. The timely warning of a pocket watch lies on the floor, with a conspicuous key on a ribbon. Like the same motif in compositions by still-life painters, these objects probably add to the usual reminder of mortality a plea for regulation, or temperance. The family’s fate literally hangs overhead in the form of a basket bearing an odd assortment of attributes. The sword and switch are instruments of justice and punishment. The crutch and metal can forecast a life of beggary; sticks of straw were sold for a pittance in the street. The wooden clapper on the left, called a Lazarusklep (Lazarus clapper), was a warning device assigned to lepers and the plague-stricken. The jack of spades signifies bad luck. The flag to the upper left might suggest that the boy with the sword will wind up in the army, which was the last refuge of young men whose families had fallen on hard times. That the same youth repels a beggar from the door adds an ironic touch. Like the Lazarusklep, the encounter recalls the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19–31), in which a beggar is turned away from the banquet of a wealthy man. The latter eventually roasts in hell while the beggar goes to heaven.

cavetocanvas:

Jan Steen, The Dissolute Household, c. 1663-64

From the Metropolitan Museum:

Steen’s canvas may be said to concisely catalogue many of Holland’s favorite faults. The sins of Sloth (embodied by the old woman at left), Lust, and Gluttony (the latter concerns any comestible, including tobacco), are at home with seemingly lesser offenses, such as sacrilege (the trampled Bible), gambling (the backgammon board), personal vanity and, of course, poor parenting skills—one of Steen’s standard subjects. These diverse violations lead to the supreme sin in Holland of a disorderly household, a form of discord (indicated here by the snapped lute strings) that in Dutch genre paintings is confirmed by litter on the floor and cats having carte blanche in the larder. 

The timely warning of a pocket watch lies on the floor, with a conspicuous key on a ribbon. Like the same motif in compositions by still-life painters, these objects probably add to the usual reminder of mortality a plea for regulation, or temperance. The family’s fate literally hangs overhead in the form of a basket bearing an odd assortment of attributes. The sword and switch are instruments of justice and punishment. The crutch and metal can forecast a life of beggary; sticks of straw were sold for a pittance in the street. The wooden clapper on the left, called a Lazarusklep (Lazarus clapper), was a warning device assigned to lepers and the plague-stricken. The jack of spades signifies bad luck. The flag to the upper left might suggest that the boy with the sword will wind up in the army, which was the last refuge of young men whose families had fallen on hard times. That the same youth repels a beggar from the door adds an ironic touch. Like the Lazarusklep, the encounter recalls the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19–31), in which a beggar is turned away from the banquet of a wealthy man. The latter eventually roasts in hell while the beggar goes to heaven.

(Source: metmuseum.org)